Archives for PDX art Blogs

Mel Katz: Notable dates in the Portland artist’s career

Mel Katz, the subject of two Oregon retrospectives in June, is an instrumental figure in the region’s contemporary art scene, and one of its more lively personalities. Here’s a look at his life and work.  1932: Born in Brooklyn, New York, to immigrant parents, a tailor and a seamstress, from what is now Belarus.  1953: Graduates from art school at Cooper Union and goes on to attend the Brooklyn Museum Art School in 1954-55. 1964: Moves to Portland and teaches as a visiting professor at the Museum Art School (now Pacific Northwest College of Art). 1965: Joins the faculty at Portland State
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Inside the studio with Mel Katz: 50 years into his career, Portland art luminary still sparkles

By GRACE KOOK-ANDERSON | For The Oregonian/OregonLive A few minutes before visitors arrive at Mel Katz’s Southeast Portland studio for an appointment, the artist is outside, vigorously scrubbing graffiti off his storefront window with acetone. Glimpsing him in action feels strangely like witnessing an extension of his art practice, in which existing lines are as important as the ones that have been erased. An air of preparation fills the studio, too, where plastic-wrapped sculptures are lined up several weeks in advance of their pick-up date for Katz’s upcoming exhibitions at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art in Salem, opening June 5;
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Richard Hunt & Lee Kelly at PNCA

My favorite Richard Hunt, Slabs of the Sunburnt West (1975) at University of Chicago There is something about heavy existential metal and by that I mean sculpture sited in public spaces. Richard Hunt and Lee Kelly are both synonymous with heavy form art in their respective cities of Chicago and Portland so it should be interesting to hear them compare notes Thursday at PNCA. Both are lyrical but I liken Hunt to being more influenced by the Futurists like Boccioni and Kelly more to language, perhaps even the design of typefaces? Moderated by Pietro Belluschi’s son Tony and his wife
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Greg Rucka’s Stumptown is Still Super Gritty

Dex Parios—the grouchy, addiction-prone P.I. of Greg Rucka’s Stumptown series—may have an acute sense of justice as she gumshoes through our familiar streets (rendered, in new Vol. 3: the Case of the King of Clubs, by artist Justin Greenwood). But when she takes a case, she doesn’t play by the rules. That also true of Stumptown‘s publisher Oni Press, the local indie house that brought us Scott Pilgrim vs. the World and recently made headlines for a $30 million film deal with Fox for Antony Johnson’s 2012 graphic novel The Coldest City (set to star Charlize Theron). Oni describes its output—more than 120
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Match Preview: Timbers vs DC United

The Portland Timbers fell in Toronto on Saturday, as they were unable to overcome a 6’ Sebastian Giovinco beauty. Adam Larsen Kwarasey’s heroics kept Portland in the game, but all of his phenomenal saves couldn’t spur his teammates to put the ball in at the other end. Rooted in 9th place in the West, kept out of the cellar solely by virtue of their three wins to Colorado’s two, Portland returns to the Rose City for a midweek clash with East (and overall) leading D.C. United. With a trip to Oregon sandwiched between two Eastern games, Ben Olson left a number
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Slow Fall To Earth

Shaking off the holiday, time to reengage? Today at HQHQ as a component of Central‘s symposium, Peripheral to What?, Amur Initiatives Media and Research presents an, “inquiry into the actuation of an airdrop.” Slow Fall to Earth | May 26 7:00PMHQHQ Project Space 232 SE Oak St #108 Read the full article here: Port admin
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Portland photographer Frank Barnett invites intimacy in solo show at Oregon Jewish Museum

For his solo exhibition at the Oregon Jewish Museum, Portland photographer Frank Barnett has distilled a selection of powerful black and white portraits, some going back 50 years. Barnett’s show, “FotoMacher – Examining Lives with Jewish Eyes,” is staged in a narrow hallway in the museum, a setting that forces, or invites, intimacy. The compelling and often haunting pictures are selected from a much larger collection that Barnett has compiled in a limited edition coffee-table book of the same title. Barnett is 76, and his past experience in the advertising and publishing worlds has made him a good editor. While the
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Artists create an impromptu gallery at Sasquatch 2015 (Photos)

Somewhere in between all four stages, tucked in between a row of vendors and a water fill station, roughly a stone’s throw from the Slurpee truck, there was an art gallery. The early afternoon sun cooked the Sasquatch! Festival on Sunday, but several artists gathered in the heat to to add to their latest works. Seattle artist and designer Curtis Ashby quietly painted the long beak of a humming bird. He had placed the realistic-looking bird in the hands of what looked like a round blue ghost, a tree branch growing from its face. It’s supposed to represent this sort of
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Museum welcomes military families for free this summer

The Museum will be closed on Memorial Day (as on all Mondays), but we are pleased to announce the Museum is opening its doors to military families to visit for free all summer, from Memorial Day to Labor Day. The Portland Art Museum is pleased to participate in Blue Star Museums, a collaboration among the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense, and more than 2,000 museums across America to offer free admission to the nation’s active duty military personnel including National Guard and Reserve and their families from Memorial Day through Labor Day 2015.
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Take a Twin Peaks Road Trip for the Show’s 25th Anniversary

This spring—May 23, specifically—is the 25th anniversary of the peak of Twin Peaks hysteria, when Agent Cooper opened his hotel room door at the Great Northern in the final minute of season one’s finale and was greeted not with the warm milk he’d ordered from room service, but with three bullets to the abdomen. Who shot him? Was he dead? Would we ever know who killed Laura Palmer? Fans had to wait four long months for any answers in the second season, and in 2015 we still have to wait a year for the promised new episodes on Showtime. But
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